Research shows that looking older may not necessarily be in poor health

Research shows that looking older may not necessarily be in poor health

In the medical world, doctors often pre-look older people are more likely to have health problems.

However, a recent study in Canada shows that getting older doesn’t mean poor health. A person’s appearance may appear to be at least 10 years older than the actual age, and health problems may occur.

  A study by Huang Sichang, an associate professor at the University of Toronto, St. Michael’s Hospital, and colleagues showed that when a person looks 5 years older than the actual age, this is not useful for doctors to judge the person’s health.

However, when a person looks more than 10 years older than their actual age, there is a 99% chance that the person is in poor health.

  Researchers conducted a study of 126 patients aged 30 to 70 years.

These patients were photographed one by one and were investigated to see if they were in poor health.

Subsequently, 58 doctors reviewed the photos and called them “looking age” if they knew the patient’s actual age.

  ”Since the medical profession, people who are significantly older are more likely to have health problems that have previously failed the practical test.

We found that many people whose appearance matches their actual age are in poor health.

Doctors should keep in mind that even if a patient’s appearance matches their actual age, they cannot assume that they are in good health.